Defending Women’s History Month – the women who deserve the same pay

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Aubrey Lyons, Staff Reporter

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According to Americanprogress.org, 57% of the people in the workforce are women. Although women take up half of the workforce, they do not get an equal amount of pay as men do in some occupations. While progress has been made toward pay parity between the sexes, The Institute For Women’s Policy Research, has estimated that equal pay for men and women will not be reached until 2059.

Today, on average, a woman working full time earns 80.7 cents for every dollar a man working full time earns. Additionally, a woman’s median annual earnings are $9,909 less than man’s, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Furthermore, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau if a male and female were to work as a healthcare practitioner, the male compared to the female would make up to $1,898 dollars more in a year. But, on average, women working as physicians or surgeons, are annually paid $19 billion less than the man in the same occupation. Why is that? Why is there such a gap between? You may ask.

“The gender pay disparity is disappointing and it’s a serious issue that we want to rectify.” said Dr. Amit Phull, Doximity’s vice president of strategy and insights, in an interview with CNN news.

Wage gaps are said to be growing primarily because of the status of the worker: whether or not they have children, if the person working is married or not, and, of course, bases solely on discrimination between the two sexes. Consequently, different races of women also experience different wage gaps as well.

If we were to compare a white woman’s wage to white man’s, she would be only earning 79% of the man’s wage. Also if we were to compare a black woman to a white man, she may be only earning 67%. And for the hispanic woman, she may earn 58%.With each race, the percentages become more alarming.

Many women compared to men work harder, achieve more and are more productive in what they do. On the other hand, there are some men who dominate and who are much better at one task than a woman.

“Unlike other industries, the medical profession doesn’t openly reveal or discuss salaries,” said Phull. “If physicians know how much their peers are making, it will give them better leverage to negotiate their pay. We want this report to provide some transparency.”

In regards to this current disparity, our president has very specific ideas.

“You’re going to make the same if you do as good a job,” President Trump responded.

 

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