An argument against Pete Rose

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An argument against Pete Rose

latimes.com

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Tyler Redding, Staff Reporter

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On August 24, 1989, Major League Baseball’s All-Time hit leader Pete Rose was placed on baseball’s ineligible list. He is banned from playing or coaching in the majors. In 1991, the ban extended into the Hall of Fame.

The all time leader in games played (3562), at bats (14053), hits (4256), singles (3215) and much more is banned from Cooperstown.

The ban is not for any performancing enhancing drug involvements. It is for allegations of betting on games while he was the manager for the Cincinnati Reds.

Rose is one of twenty-three people associated with baseball to be given a lifetime ban. It is a combination of players, owners, managers, coaches, general managers and even a scout.

Most of the bans during the 1900s were for betting against games or intentionally throwing games, which Rose is being accused of.

Rule 21 (d) of the Official Baseball Rules states that gambling prohibits any sort of betting. No player, umpire or anyone within the organization can place a bet on a baseball game.

If the bettor has no duty to perform, he will get a one year suspension compared to the permanent ban for those who do have a duty to perform.

The rule states, “Any player, umpire, or club or league official or employee, who shall bet any sum whatsoever upon any baseball game in connection with which the bettor has a duty to perform shall be declared permanently ineligible.”

Rose has gone back and forth saying that he has bet on games as a manager and that he has not bet on any games as player.

A player and a manager both have a duty to perform.  

That, of course, violates Rule 21 (d).

For a two month period in 1987, Rose betted on every single Cincinnati game. He made bets that his Reds would win every game, except four.

Those four games were all started by Bill Gullickson. Gullickson proceeded to give up seven runs, five runs, and six runs twice over the four starts.

He was relieved each time by Bill Scherrer, who at the time of the first game had an ERA north of 12 and finished with a 4.36 ERA over 33 innings in 1987.

A below league average starting pitcher is being replaced by a below league average reliever? Seems a little fishy.

But maybe it’s time to let “Charlie Hustle” in.

In May of 2018, the declared the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act unconstitutional.

Basically, states can now have legal sports betting.

Several states have already opened legal sports betting locations.

On top of that, there are several sport betting websites, such as Draftkings, where bettors pick who they believe will have a good game and basically bet on them.

If they have a good game, you win some money. If they don’t, you lose some money.

Or what about all the paid fantasy sport leagues?

Right now, Pete Rose is ineligible for the Hall of Fame for something he did that is now legal in the United States.

Two die hard baseball fans, Scott and Jeff Dobrydney, were interviewed to see what they thought on Pete Rose in the Hall of Fame.

Scott was all in on letting Rose in.

“You look at what Pete did while playing the game for over 20 years. He holds all time records in baseball. That alone should get him into the Hall of Fame.”

But he placed bets on the game while he was a manager.

“Yes he has. And he has admitted to that. The Hall of Fame takes in anyone: managers, players, and even executives.”

“There have been several Hall of Fame managers who played the game and did not have Hall of Fame careers up at the plate (or on the mound). And it goes the other way too.”

“I’m not saying that we should just forget about the betting, but Rose is a part of baseball history. You need to have him in, at least as a player.”

Jeff was not in agreement with his brother.

“He broke a rule. He admitted to it as well which only hurts his case. He is suffering from the consequences.”

“You look at guys like (Barry) Bonds and (Roger) Clemens who have been speculated to have taken steroids, but have never admitted to taking them. They are both having an extremely difficult time getting the 75% of votes needed to get the Hall of Fame plaque.”

“I can’t see the Hall putting in a guy who has publicly admitted to betting on baseball games while there are guys who, may or may not have taken steroids, can’t get in.”

Scott interrupted with a rebuttal, “How do you know everyone in is clean?”

“You don’t. But guess what? You, me, Tyler, the writers, and everyone knows that Pete Rose placed bets on major league games. He broke a rule and is ineligible. Bottom line.”

Pete Rose wants baseball to change their mind and put him in the Hall of Fame, but he has not changed with his betting tactics.  

Carol Rose, the second divorced wife of Rose, has court documents saying the Rose makes well over $1 million a year from autograph sessions and appearances. However, he is still in debt due to payments still needed to be made to casinos and the IRS.

Although Rose has Hall of Fame statistics and the back of his baseball card says he should be a first ballot hall of famer, will baseball waive their gambling rule and allow Rose into Cooperstown?

It is extremely difficult to see Pete Rose getting into the Hall of Fame, at least while he is still alive.

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